Category
Privacy
Los Angeles Times Building

Judge Issues Protective Order for LA Times Reporters in Ongoing Lawsuit Against LA County

A Los Angeles Superior Court judge ruled that journalists at the Los Angeles Times do not have to disclose the […]

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San Francisco Police Raid

San Francisco Police Chief Apologizes For Raid On Journalist’s Home and Office

Police raided the home and office of a San Francisco freelance videographer in connection with an investigation over a leaked police report. The freelancer, Bryan Carmody, had received the leaked report which included salacious details of the events surrounding the sudden death of San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi. First Amendment advocates contend that the search violates California Shield Law.

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Missouri Governor Mike Parson

Missouri Attorney General Changes His Mind About Exceptions to Sunshine Laws

August 21, 2019: “Very Limited Instances” When Privacy Can Be Used to Withhold Government Records, says Missouri Attorney General. On […]

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New York State Bar Association

New York Fair Trial Free Press Conference

Every year, the New York State Bar Association (NYSBA) convenes a panel of journalists, judges, and lawyers to discuss a […]

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Cell phone

Could The Presidential Text Message Alert System Violate The First Amendment? Lawsuit Says Yes

Three people fought back against the first-ever national presidential text message alert system in the hopes of stopping a scheduled […]

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Nikolas Cruz

Florida School Board Wants To Hold Newspaper In Contempt For Publishing Parkland Shooter’s Records

A Broward County judge lambasted the Sun Sentinel for publishing disclosed information contained in a redacted report that the paper […]

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Equal pay equal work stock photo

In A Blow to Women and Minorities Seeking Pay Parity, Judge Rules Philadelphia Cannot Ban Salary History Inquiry Under First Amendment

The Chamber of Commerce of Greater Philadelphia brought a lawsuit against Philadephia for an ordinance that banned employers from inquiring about a job-seeker’s salary history, stating that it was 'bad for business.' The ordinance has two parts - "it prohibits an employer from inquiring about a prospective employee’s wage history (“the Inquiry Provision”); and second, it makes it illegal for an employer to rely on wage history “at any stage in the employment process” to determine a salary for an employee (“the Reliance Provision”)." Philadelphia approved the ordinance in January to take effect this May. However, U.S. District Judge Mitchell S. Goldberg of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania ruled that the "inquiry provision" specifically violated the First Amendment's free speech clause. “Although the ordinance represents a significant positive attempt to address the wage gap, the First Amendment compels me to enjoin implementation of the inquiry provision." Will this chill efforts in other states and cities that have been passing similar ordinances?

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Lata Nott Podcast: Free Speech and the Internet

The Newseum Institute’s First Amendment expert, Lata Nott, originally published this podcast on the Newseum blog, and has given First […]

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