Category
Protected Speech
Virginia Profanity

Virginia Repeals Outdated Ban on “Profane Swearing”

The Virginia code dates back to George Washington’s 1776 “Order Against Profanity” which was used to keep soldiers from engaging in “the foolish and wicked practice of profane cursing and swearing.”

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California DMV Settles with Owner of “Come on You Whites” License Plate

The license plate, which included a reference to a slogan used by Jonathan Kotler's favorite soccer team, was rejected after officials determined it contained an "offensive connotation."

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Colorado Looks to Strengthen Protections for Student Journalists and Their Faculty Advisers

A Democratic state representative and former journalism teacher from Colorado, Barbara McLachlan, is pushing for legislation that would provide extra protections for student journalists and the teachers who advise them. 

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Punished for Shouting a Racial Epithet, Students Take UConn to Court

Neither Mucaj nor Karal directed the epithet toward anybody in particular, but uttered it out loud as part of a juvenile game that tested the other’s willingness to shout obscenities. Now, they say the university is using a vague policy to punish them for speech that, while offensive, is constitutionally protected.

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New Hampshire Bill Seeks To Regulate News Reporting of Criminal Proceedings

The bill has attracted heavy criticism from the state’s media organizations who say similar laws have been ruled unconstitutional by the Supreme Court.

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California Town Looks to Amend Anti-Panhandling Law to Address Free Speech Concerns

A city council in Eureka, California is planning to amend a 2016 ordinance that regulated “aggressive and intrusive” panhandling after concerns that the law likely violated the First Amendment. 

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DeRay Mckesson

Judge Revises Opinion in Lawsuit Against Black Lives Matter Activist

While Judge Willet had originally agreed with the majority opinion—that Mckesson could be held liable for injuries caused by a rogue protester—his new opinion reveals a rare judicial change of mind.

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Camcorder

Resident Sues Minnesota City For Prohibitions On Filming In Public Parks

The City of Bloomington, Minnesota is being sued over a recently enacted city ordinance that prohibits filming children in public parks without their parents’ permission. Bloomington resident Sally Ness filed a suit in the United States District Court for the District of Minnesota, arguing that the ordinance violates her First Amendment right to film in public spaces.

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