Category
Offensive Speech
University of California Student

University of California, San Diego Reaches Settlement with Satirical Student Publication

The newspaper sued the university after the student government passed a bill excluding media student groups from accessing activity funds. The legislation was passed just days after the paper published a controversial article satirizing safe spaces.

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Student Settles Free Speech Lawsuit with California School District

The former high school student sued after his class president title was striped over an offensive video he posted on his Twitter account.

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Texas Appeals Court Rejects Alex Jones’ Motion to Dismiss Heslin Defamation Suit

The judge has ordered Jones to pay Heslin $22,250 in attorney fees, making the total amount Jones now owes Neil Heslin just under $150,000.

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Parkland

Man Who “Trolled” Parkland Shooting Victims’ Families Sentenced to 5 Years in Prison

Fleury’s lawyers tried to dismiss the case ahead of his trial in October 2019, arguing that his comments, though noxious, were protected under the First Amendment. But U.S. District Judge Rodolfo Ruiz rejected their motion, writing that Fleury’s expression fell under a category of unprotected speech called true threats.

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Tennessee Lawmakers Copy Missouri’s Library Censorship Bill

Like the one proposed in Missouri, the Tennessee bill would make it so that a librarian could serve jail time for giving a child a book deemed inappropriate by the parental review board.

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Judge Dismisses Suit Filed by “Unite the Right” Protesters, Says State Did Not Engage in Heckler’s Veto

“While Defendants did, of course, have a constitutional obligation to refrain from restricting Plaintiff’s speech on account of the threat, or possibility, of public hostility to their Alt-Right message, the law is clear that Defendants had no constitutional obligation to prevent that public hostility,” Judge Norman K. Moon wrote.

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Gun T-shirt

Parents of Two High School Students Sue Over Right to Wear Gun T-Shirts in Class

The lawsuit argues that the students’ shirts do not advocate for violent or illegal use of firearms, but are meant to express support for “the value to society of personal possession of arms as guaranteed by the Second Amendment.”

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Virginia Profanity

Virginia Repeals Outdated Ban on “Profane Swearing”

The Virginia code dates back to George Washington’s 1776 “Order Against Profanity” which was used to keep soldiers from engaging in “the foolish and wicked practice of profane cursing and swearing.”

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