Category
Campus Speech
Connecticut University

Police Arrest Two Students at the University of Connecticut for Using a Racial Slur

While the boys’ language was undoubtedly offensive, civil liberties groups say the statute used to arrest them is unconstitutional on First Amendment grounds. 

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Book burning

Students at Georgia Southern University Burn Book By Latina Author

After disagreeing with the way Jennine Capó Crucet’s novel, “Make Your Home Among Strangers,” presented white privilege, a group of students at Georgia Southern University decided to burn her book. The incident serves as an interesting example of a form of expression that is at once protected speech—symbolic speech—and a symbol of censorship.

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Appeals Court Rules University of Michigan’s Bias Response Team Indirectly Chills Speech

"Even if an official lacks actual power to punish," the appeals court argued, "the threat of punishment from a public official who appears to have punitive authority can be enough to produce an objective chill."

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Betsy DeVos

Department of Education Letter Threatens UNC and Duke with Funding Cuts

In an unprecedented move, the Education Department has ordered a Middle East studies program at Duke and UNC to change its curriculum or else risk losing Title VI funding.

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University of California Student

Appeals Court Rules that University Violated Satirical Publications’ First Amendment Rights

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit overturned a lower court’s ruling that had dismissed a lawsuit brought […]

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Donald Trump and Jerry Falwell Jr.

Liberty University’s President Defends Right to Censor Student Newspaper

Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. defended his right to censor the university’s student newspaper, arguing that the practice does […]

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Columbia University President

Columbia President Lee Bollinger Weighs In On The State of Campus Speech

Columbia University president and First Amendment scholar Lee Bollinger writes about the state of free speech on college campuses. Despite […]

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Defunding of Student Newspaper Violates First Amendment, Says Watchdog Group

An independent student newspaper lost its funding in a recent referendum vote, and the process violates the First Amendment, says Freedom for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE). Since The Daily Targumbroke free from Rutgers University in 1980, it has had to rely on funding from the student body, which votes every three years on whether to allocate student fees to fund the newspaper. In order to qualify for funding, at least 25 percent of the student body has to vote on the referendum. But following a two-year campaign by a right-leaning student group to deny funding for the student newspaper, for the first time in 39 years, voter turnout was too low to qualify the publication for funding.

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