Archive

Smartmatic Sues Fox News For $2.7 Billion Over Election Fraud Claims

Smartmatic claims Fox spread lies about the company it knew weren't true in order to curry favor with then-President Trump and his base. The company expects it will lose almost $500 million in the next five years due to the impact the lies have had on its business.  

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Incarcerated Journalist Claims Prison Officials Punished Him for Reporting on COVID-19 Outbreak

Private prison officials at a halfway house in California seized an incarcerated journalist’s phone and delayed his release after he texted a colleague about a COVID-19 outbreak at the facility, according to a lawsuit filed in federal court on February 2nd.

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Federal Appeals Court Finds Connecticut Law Mandating Closure of Transferred Juvenile Cases Unconstitutional

The Hartford Courant has a qualified First Amendment right of access to the criminal proceedings of juveniles who are transferred to adult criminal court, the Second U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled. In July 2019, Connecticut passed a law that increased confidentiality for those cases transferred from juvenile courts to adult courts.

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Virginia Senate

Virginia Lawmaker Files Lawsuit After State Senate Votes to Censure Her

On February 1st, a Virginia state senator filed a federal lawsuit against the Senate of Virginia, the lieutenant governor, and the president of the Senate after lawmakers voted to censure her for speaking at then-President Donald Trump’s rally prior to the attack on the Capitol on January 6th. 

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First Amendment Watch Teacher Guide: Prior Restraints—The Most Egregious Violation of First Amendment Rights

Prior restraints prevent material from ever reaching the public, a serious step that diminishes the marketplace of ideas and the well of information that informs citizens in a self-governing society. Under the First Amendment, the Supreme Court has developed a very high barrier for the government to secure such a restraint.

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Missouri State Official Can Block Users From Her Twitter Account, Eighth Circuit Rules

Not every “political” social media account run by a public official is a public forum, a three-judge panel for the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit ruled on January 27th. The case involves a Missouri state legislator who was sued by her political opponent after she blocked him from her Twitter account. 

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Twitter

Justice Department Asks SCOTUS To Vacate Knight v. Trump Ruling

A day before Joe Biden's inauguration, the Justice Department under Donald Trump made a last-minute effort to undo a major court decision related to public official's social media accounts.

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Alex Jones Deposition

Texas Supreme Court Says Defamation Suits Against Alex Jones Can Continue

On January 22nd, the Texas Supreme Court rejected conspiracy theorist Alex Jones’ request to toss four defamation lawsuits filed by parents whose children died in the 2012 mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. The suits claim that Jones' statements calling the mass shooting a “giant hoax,” and accusing the parents of faking their children’s death were defamatory and caused the families emotional distress.

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