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Social Media
KeyBoard Hatespeech

Upcoming Panel Discussion on Hate Speech in Washington, D.C

First Amendment Watch, ConSource, and the John Brademas Center at New York University will co-host a panel discussion entitled, “Hate Speech on Social Media: Is There a Way to a More Civil Discussion?”

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Tulsi Gabbard

Presidential Candidate Tulsi Gabbard Sues Google for $50 Million For Free Speech Violations

U. S. Representative and  Democratic presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard filed a lawsuit in the United States District Court for the […]

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President Donald Trump

Ballard Spahr: Second Circuit Affirms That President Trump’s Blocking of Opponents on His Twitter Account Violates First Amendment

Reprinted with Permission from Ballard Spahr The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit yesterday became the third federal […]

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Facebook

Laura Loomer Sues Facebook for Defamation, Requesting More Than $3 Billion in Punitive Damages 

Laura Loomer, an Internet personality known for her anti-Muslim rhetoric, is suing Facebook for defamation after the company banned her […]

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Amy Gajda

Tulane Law Professor Amy Gadja On Privacy Rights

Amy Gadja is a professor of law at Tulane Law School in New Orleans. Gadja, a former TV news reporter […]

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Hate Speech on Social Media: Is There a Way to a More Civil Discussion?

 First Amendment Watch and ConSource, a leading site that encourages discussion of the U.S. Constitution, hosted a panel discussion entitled, […]

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Pro-Gun Activists Sue Texas Politician Who Blocked Them On Facebook

The founders of a pro-gun rights group that was blocked by a state politician on social media filed a lawsuit […]

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White House Refuses to Endorse Christchurch Call, citing Free Speech Concerns

In the wake of the deadly mass shooting at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, the country’s Prime Minister is leading an effort to stamp out extremism online. The “Christchurch Call” asks for “collective, voluntary commitments" from governments and online service providers to stop the spread of extremism. The non-binding doctrine has been signed by 18 countries, including France and Canada, and by five tech companies, including Facebook, Twitter, Google, Amazon, and Microsoft. The Trump administration, however, declined to sign the Christchurch Call, citing free speech concerns.

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